Federated Co-ops Ag News

  • Think Twice Before Cutting Seed Treatments

    A number of growers are thinking about ways to reduce input costs for their 2015 soybean crop. "Things such as reducing seeding rate, using generics, and opting not to use a soybean seed treatment are valid ways to cut costs, but all come with their own risks," said Kevin Carlson, Federated's senior agronomist.

    If you've thought about cutting seed treatments, think again. A common soybean disease is Phytophthora, and since there are many soybean varieties that claim excellent field tolerance and may possess genes for resistance to this disease, it's easy to think a seed-applied fungicide is not necessary. But, consider these factors in your decision:

    Another common disease is Rhizoctonia. These photos show stunting, reduced root growth, and red lesions on the root. Seed treatment can help prevent this, and again, there is no rescue treatment once the disease has infected the plant.

    Carlson said, "In the end, a seed treatment such as CruiserMaxx® Beans with Vibrance insecticide / fungicide is a really good investment no matter where grain prices land." Talk to your local Federated Agronomist to learn more!

    • First, the specific genes in the seed may cover some, but not all, races of Phytophthora, which can leave your crop exposed to certain races.
    • Secondly, those specific genes are not immediately active and leave the plants unprotected until about the third trifoliate stage. That leaves at least two unprotected stages - a seed-applied fungicide can cover the gap until the plant can defend itself.
    • Thirdly, when it comes to seed and seedling diseases, there are no rescue treatments. Once an infection takes place, little can be done to remedy the situation.
    • Lastly, adding another mode of action is always good for long-term resistance management.

    Another common disease is Rhizoctonia. These photos show stunting, reduced root growth, and red lesions on the root. Seed treatment can help prevent this, and again, there is no rescue treatment once the disease has infected the plant.

    Carlson said, "In the end, a seed treatment such as CruiserMaxx® Beans with Vibrance insecticide / fungicide is a really good investment no matter where grain prices land." Talk to your local Federated Agronomist to learn more!

  • Soybean Cyst Nematode Plot Results

    While planting beans on beans is generally not recommended, this plot was a good trial for looking at a response to Clariva™ nematicide seed treatment because of the bean-on-bean environment, as well as the increased cyst nematode pressure created by that environment.

    The response to treatment was significant. This is not a replicated trial; it was conducted in cooperation with grower Dan Carlson as a strip trial planted side by side the length of the field.

    Plot background:

    • No-till
    • Beans five years in a row
    • Pre-season egg count: 1260 eggs per 100 cc
    • Burndown herbicide: Enlite® at 2.8 oz. per acre
    • Post herbicide: Flexstar GT® 3.5 at 2.67 pts. per acre
    • Soybean Variety: NK® S12-H2* (only one variety for both treatments)
    • Seed treatment: Clariva™ Complete (cyst nematode treatment)
    • Seed treatment CruiserMaxx® Advanced (non-cyst nematode check)
    • 0.53 acres for each treatment, not replicated, side by side
    • Planting date: 5-17-2014
    • Cushing loam soil, medium soil texture, well drained
    • Planting conditions: wet
    • Complete plot results linked here.

    *NK S12-H2 in yield trials for 2014 was a top yielding variety.